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Planning TV: Designing Liveable Cities

What are the ingredients for a liveable city? This episode of Planning TV discusses the range of aspects that planners need to look out for. From designing walkability to the socio-economic context of the site, planners also need to ensure that there is connectivity and integration built into their vision. Good project management is also key, but bringing in all public and private stakeholders to be included in design processes right from the beginning.

Joining us for this discussion are Gary Rice, Director at Interpolitan Ltd; Margot Orr, Global Masterplanning Lead at Atkins Acuity; and Jamie McKie from Dentons’ Planning and Public Law Team.

Dentons Planning TV is a new and innovative platform for engaging in and reacting to the latest developments in the dynamic world of planning. Its mission statement is simple: to provoke debate and facilitate engagement at all levels in the planning process.

Brought to you by Dentons and Citiesmode it draws on the knowledge of a core panel of experts from across the sector, supplemented with special guests hand picked for their particular expertise. From Greenbelt to Brownfield, national planning policy to local plan-making and everything in between, Dentons Planning TV provides a unique insight into the thoughts of those involved at the sharp end.

Free-Standing Sustainable Development Assessment a Mistake

In Reigate and Banstead BC v SoS CLG [2017] EWHC 1562 (Admin), Lang, J quashed permission granted on appeal for development on greenfield land intended for release in the development plan only if needed to boost housing land supply (HLS).

The recently-adopted Local Plan provided for almost a 5 year HLS, constrained so as to be unable to meet full objectively assessed need (OAN). Despite its “urban area first” strategy, the Inspector worked on the basis that sustainable development should be approved in the absence of harm.  He found that there was not basis for dismissing it because the proposal would reduce the HLS shortfall against OAN over the plan period and would not significantly prejudice the spatial strategy given its scale (45 homes).

The authority challenged the decision on the basis that the Inspector had inverted the statutory requirement to determine the appeal in accordance with the development plan, subject to material considerations otherwise (s38(6) PCPA 2004).

The judgment identifies ten key propositions for NPPF14 cases, including:

  • The need to distinguish between local and national policies which describe what qualifies as sustainable development (e.g. NPPF 6, 7, 18 to 219) and policies that determine when a presumption in favour of such development arises.
  • That the NPPF 14 exhaustively defines when a presumption in favour of sustainable development can arise. There is no general presumption outside NPPF 14 (applying Trustees of the Barker Mill Estates v SoS CLG [2016] EWHC 3028 (Admin) and Cheshire East BC v SoS CLG [2016] EWHC 571 (Admin)). The Inspector could – in theory – have reached the same outcome by applying the s38(6) starting point but giving in efforts to close the OAN gap greater weight.  However, the judgment implies that in the absence of something significant – such as evidence that local housing stress had worsened substantially since the Local Plan was adopted – the decision would be have been doomed to the same fate.
  • One proposition seems out of kilter with the rest – that the NPPF14 presumption “does not extend to a proposal which conflicts with the development plan“. Although not relevant in Reigate, NPPF14 is explicit that the presumption does extend to such proposals where (1) the development plan is absent, silent or relevant policies are out‑of‑date and (2) any adverse impacts of granting consent would not significantly and demonstrably outweigh the benefits considered against NPPF policies in the round (and no specific restrictive NPPF policies apply – which should now include ‘related’ development plan policies following Suffolk Coastal District Council v Hopkins Homes Ltd & Onr [2017] 1 WLR 1865).

DCO Decision Confirms Heritage Approach

In R (on the application of John Mars Jones on his own behalf and on behalf of the Pylon The Pressure Group) v The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy [2017] EWHC 1111 (Admin), the High Court dismissed the judicial review of a Development Consent Order made under the Planning Act 2008 by the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.  The Order authorised an overhead electricity line to wind farms following developer requests to connect to the network. The Claimant, whose Grade II* listed Tudor farm lay within 125 metres of the route, challenged the decision to make the Order on several grounds, including the treatment of heritage effects.

The Secretary of State was required to regard to two relevant policy statements under section 5 of the 2008 Act – Overarching National Policy Statement for Energy (EN-1) (“EN-1”) and the National Policy Statement for Electricity Networks Infrastructure (EN-5) (“EN-5”).  The policy statements together required careful consideration of the feasibility of alternatives to overhead lines and the protection of heritage assets. He was required to determined the Order application in accordance with them unless, among other things, satisfied that the adverse impact of the proposals would outweigh the benefits.  He was also required to have regard to the desirability of preserving listed buildings or their setting (under regulation 3 of the Infrastructure Planning (Decisions) Regulations 2010).

The Order was approved, on the basis that in the absence of substantial harm, there was no need for the disproportionate costs of undergrounding the cable section.

Dismissing the challenge, Lewis, J held on the main grounds that:

  • The  approach to heritage effects had been correct – identifying the scale of harm and then weighing the scheme benefits against, among other things, the heritage harm.
  • The regulation 3 duty had been complied with looking at the report and decision as a whole. There was no duty to consider alternatives not forming part of the Order scheme and the option of refusal had been properly considered.
  • Permanent extinguishment of private rights – despite the temporary nature of the Order -was not a principal controversial issue and did not require specific reasons to be given on it.
  • The fact that the weighing exercise was in a different part of the  part of the report to the assessment of heritage harm did not matter. It is worth noting that the limited (30 year) duration of the Order was accepted as minimising the impact on the setting of the listed buildings (being for period which would be insubstantial relative to the life of the buildings) and offering a sensitive approach to heritage effects.

Two become one

An examination of the current planning position on amalgamation of units. In recent years there has been a strong trend in the central London residential market for the creation of substantial residential properties through the reconversion of previously subdivided houses, the amalgamation of purpose-built flats or adjoining houses, and lateral amalgamation of units. As a consequence, there has been increased focus on decisions regarding amalgamation.

Read the full article

This article was first published in Property Law Journal (July/August 2017) and is also available at http://www.lawjournals.co.uk/.

Planning TV: Planning and New Tech

New technologies such as 3D printing have the potential to change the way that planners, urban designers and architects work, by helping them to operate more efficiently and allowing them to show their ideas spatially.

Planning TV’s tech correspondent Kadine James is joined by Jamie McKie from Dentons’ Planning and Public Law Team to talk about new opportunities for public engagement in the planning process.

Kadine also went to Barking Riverside to meet Matthew Carpen, Executive Director of Barking Riverside and to look at the UK’s largest 3D printed masterplan, which shows how a new development is underway to bring over 10,000 new homes to a part of East London.

Dentons Planning TV is a new and innovative platform for engaging in and reacting to the latest developments in the dynamic world of planning. Its mission statement is simple: to provoke debate and facilitate engagement at all levels in the planning process.

Brought to you by Dentons and Citiesmode it draws on the knowledge of a core panel of experts from across the sector, supplemented with special guests hand picked for their particular expertise. From Greenbelt to Brownfield, national planning policy to local plan-making and everything in between, Dentons Planning TV provides a unique insight into the thoughts of those involved at the sharp end.

Planning TV: A Closer Look at Masterplanning in Canada Water


This episode of Planning TV discusses the principles of masterplanning, with an update on the Canada Water masterplan in southeast London.

Joining the discussion are Gary Rice, Director at Interpolitan Ltd; Margot Orr, Global Masterplanning Lead at Atkins Acuity; and Jamie McKie from Dentons’ Planning and Public Law Team.

Dentons Planning TV is a new and innovative platform for engaging in and reacting to the latest developments in the dynamic world of planning. Its mission statement is simple: to provoke debate and facilitate engagement at all levels in the planning process.

Brought to you by Dentons and Citiesmode it draws on the knowledge of a core panel of experts from across the sector, supplemented with special guests hand picked for their particular expertise. From Greenbelt to Brownfield, national planning policy to local plan-making and everything in between, Dentons Planning TV provides a unique insight into the thoughts of those involved at the sharp end.

Viability Decisions – Care Needed on ‘Market Value’ Assumptions

The recent Parkhurst Road appeal decision emphasises the importance of understanding how  land value expectation (and so the price for land) should reflect planning policy requirements.

The appeal decision dismissed the 96-home proposals for the disused Territorial Army centre on Parkhurst Road, Holloway on the grounds that it would not provide the “maximum reasonable” level of affordable housing, as required by the council’s core strategy. The appellants offered ten per cent affordable provision, reflecting a purchase price of £13.25 million (which, in light of nearby sales data, was said to be the market value for the site). The Inspector accepted the authority’s approach, starting with the site’s established use value (EUV) and applying a significant premium, to reach an overall benchmark nearly half that put forward (at which 34% provision was feasible).

Caution is needed on whether the decision is really a game-changer or just a reminder of home truths.

Benchmark, not Landmark

The decision is a benchmark, of existing policy, rather than a landmark in terms of a new approach. It shows a willingness to take policy and guidance at its word and treat land value as genuinely residual to policy requirements (even where they are expressed to be ‘subject to viability’).  It does not junk the comparable approach, nor does it undermine the use of either a substantial premium to Existing Use Value  (EUV Plus) or use of Alternative Use Value where appropriate to reflect the need for an incentive to release land.  It is a reminder of the need to critically examine evidence of comparable values to weed out those which failed to comply with policy in the first place (i.e. are not truly comparable).

It also illustrates the role that the Mayor’s Housing Supplementary Planning Guidance (March 2016) will play in London in clarifying that the outcome should rarely be different whether either the EUV Plus or the RICS market value basis is used properly.

Context is everything

The backdrop to this particular decision also matters. In a previous (2015) appeal, the Inspector’s finding that the price paid was broadly reasonable in light of ‘market signals’ (competing bids and comparables) resulted in a letter from the Government responding to the threat of legal proceedings by Islington acknowledging that the PPG’sunambiguous policy position” is “in all cases land or site value … should reflect policy requirements and planning obligations…”.

The 2017 decision adopts a more critical approach to giving effect to that, but is not really that different to other appeal decisions through the years which reflect the same fundamental point already flagged in the PPG (look back, for example, at the 2013 Holsworthy Showground decision) discounting price paid as an overbid against true market value.

Technical Pointers

Both the 2015 and 2017 decisions acknowledge the appropriateness of a viability Review. A 24 month ‘grace period’ was acceptable to avoid a pre-implementation Review but seeking a 22% margin at the Review stage when the effective profit on the 10% AFH offered at appeal was 18% was – sensibly – rejected on the basis that the development risk is already rewarded by the preserved return of 18%.

It is also significant that a requirement not to leave the homes empty for more than 3 months (under its adopted Preventing Wasted Housing Supply SPD, July 2015) was rejected on the basis of doubts about both the justification for, and the enforceability of, the obligation. The latter point should be scrutinised as a proper consideration in judging the reasonableness of the obligation – not least because it would suggest that the kind of obligations required by the St Ives Neighbourhood Plan could never be given effect.

Planning TV: Tweak CIL


The CIL Review Panel’s long awaited report: A new approach to developer contributions was published in February 2017.  A key recommendation is that the Government should replace the Community Infrastructure Levy with a hybrid system of a broad and low level Local Infrastructure Tariff (LIT) and Section 106 for larger developments.  We will have to wait a bit longer for the government’s response which is expected in Autumn 2017.

We spoke to Roy Pinnock, Partner at Dentons about the review and potential reform of CIL. His view on CIL: tweak it don’t trash it.

Dentons Planning TV is a new and innovative platform for engaging in and reacting to the latest developments in the dynamic world of planning. Its mission statement is simple: to provoke debate and facilitate engagement at all levels in the planning process.

Brought to you by Dentons and Citiesmode it draws on the knowledge of a core panel of experts from across the sector, supplemented with special guests hand picked for their particular expertise. From Greenbelt to Brownfield, national planning policy to local plan-making and everything in between, Dentons Planning TV provides a unique insight into the thoughts of those involved at the sharp end.

What happens to old applications?

The question of what powers LPAs have to deal with old planning applications is raised by both applicants, concerned that their planning application may be unilaterally withdrawn, and LPAs, keen to understand their options for dealing with undetermined applications.

A LPA can decline to deal with an application if: (i) it is not made in the prescribed form; (ii) the circumstances set out in section 70A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 (‘TCPA’) apply (namely, the LPA / Secretary of State has refused a similar application in the previous 2 year period and there has been no significant change in the relevant considerations); or (iii) it constitutes an overlapping application under section 70B TCPA.  However, there is no power for an LPA to actually withdraw a planning application.

Instead, an LPA may seek to record the application as “finally disposed of” to avoid the application remaining open indefinitely. What does this mean?  What is the effect?

“Finally disposed of”

The term “finally disposed of” is used in article 40 of the General Development Procedure Order 2015 (‘GDPO’).  Under article 40(2) GDPO, each local planning register authority must keep a register of every live application for planning permission relating to their area.

Article 40(13) GDPO sets out the circumstances in which an application can be treated as finally disposed of.  In summary, this is where an application has been:

  1. granted or refused by the LPA  and the time limit for appealing has expired without appeal;
  2. referred / appealed to the Secretary of State, who has issued a decision and any application to the High Court has been finally determined;
  3. withdrawn before being decided by the LPA / Secretary of State or an appeal has been withdrawn before the Secretary of State has issued a decision; or
  4. finally, the period for determination and appeal has expired no decision has been made.  This means that a LPA can simply record an application as finally disposed of as soon as the period for determination and appeal has expired – so watch for that date.

Once any of these requirements are satisfied, the LPA may treat the application as finally disposed of and elect to remove the application from its Planning Register.

Best Practice for applicants

To avoid an application being finally disposed of, applicants should either: (i) agree to extend the time period for the Council to determine the application; or (ii) if the LPA fails to determine the application within the statutory period, appeal on the grounds of non-determination. Applicants should note that if the application period is extended, the right to a refund is lost, even if the authority fails to meet the extended deadline.

Best Practice for LPAs

Once the date for determination has passed, consideration should be given at regular intervals to whether the application should be deemed “finally disposed of” and removed from the Planning Register. Given the cost and expense of submitting an application an LPA should notify the applicant of its intention to treat an application as “finally disposed of” before doing so.  This should set out a timetable for dealing with any outstanding matters.

Refusal as an Alternative

Rather than recording an application as “finally disposed of”, LPAs could simply refuse the application. However, LPAs are often  keen to avoid this course of action for 2 reasons:

  1. Refusal rates are monitored nationally and, in theory, LPAs with clear policies and effective pre-application advice should issue fewer refusals.  LPAs may therefore be concerned that refusing such application will have a negative impact on their performance figures; and
  2. It would reinstate an applicant’s right to appeal.
  3. Given the above, it is likely that LPAs will continue to treat applications as “finally disposed of” unless a formal procedure for LPAs to withdraw planning applications is implemented.  This is unlikely to be high on the agenda at any time in the near future given the raft of more pressing planning matters.

Planning and the General Election: keys to long term success

With the General Election drawing ever closer, planning forms the battleground for a several controversial issues close to voters’ hearts, such as fracking and safeguarding the greenbelt. In particular, persistent difficulties in delivering new housing and infrastructure unite the parties in a common cause. More homes are needed, quickly, together with greater certainty around delivery of supporting infrastructure.

The extent to which the next Government succeeds in solving these problems will be determined by its appetite to grapple with a host of underlying difficulties. These include devising an effective model for land value capture, making the CPO process fit for purpose and addressing the chronic shortfall in local authority resourcing.

Despite obvious distractions elsewhere during this campaign, housing delivery still sits atop the planning agenda, with the manifestos all setting targets and the broad route needed to reach them. The Conservatives will point to steps already taken along this long and winding road – most recently through the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 and its predecessor the Housing and Planning Act 2016. Similarly, the Housing White Paper affords us the rare luxury of a detailed annex to the aspirations commonly found in (deliberately) loosely drafted manifesto commitments. Whilst less “radical” than badged, it establishes a framework of policy changes aimed at speeding up housing delivery, through measures such as diversifying the market, getting local plans in place and holding the public and private sectors to account for delivery.

Housing delivery at scale is recognised as being paramount. This requires a commitment to supporting the growth of new towns and garden communities – where the worlds of housing and infrastructure collide most spectacularly. The Liberal Democrats propose at least 10 new garden communities whilst Labour also underline the need to start on a “new generation” of new towns. The current system already supports that drive with the introduction of a potentially significant power in the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 allowing Regulations to facilitate the designation of areas as new towns and for development corporations to be established.

Whichever party emerges victorious on 8th June, there is a sense that the keys to long-term success are not entirely in their hands. We are witnessing a shift in emphasis towards the increased role of the public sector as an enabler of development. The extent to which they are willing and able to embrace that role will go a long way towards determining whether the same issues – and proposed fixes – will remain on the planning agenda in 2022.