1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar

Autumn Statement: mood music?

In the absence of the Housing White Paper, the industry is still left needing to mind the gap.  We have simplified budgets – abolishing the Autumn Statement – but no hint of simplified planning for growth.

The overall commitment to housing is welcome mood music, but the lack of detail on powers and fiscal incentives to support locally-led Garden Towns to deliver at the scale needed leaves a hole.  Expanding grant funding for affordable tenures is great news but at £25,000 per unit is not going to be life changing.

hamThe £2.3bn Housing Infrastructure Fund could be a game changer if it is used to reward areas for proactively planning for growth. Making an up to date housing land supply a condition for at least some of the funding would dangle the right carrot for authorities that currently only have the stick. The lack of fiscal measures for new settlements – incentivising forward funding of major infrastructure that can unlock delivery at real scale – is disappointing though.

Affordable Housing is heading towards life support – delivery in 2015-16 was 52% lower than last year.  The announcement in the Autumn Statement of a funding injection to deliver 40,000 affordable homes is welcome. It is a clear recognition that addressing the housing shortage is not simply about building more homes.  Yes, we need more but they must meet a variety of needs. There are further signals of a softening of the Government’s stance on Starter Homes – tenure flexibility replacing David Cameron’s commitment to a single tenure.

Without the Housing White Paper, there is also still a wait to see how the NPPF is going to be reshaped and in particular how housing land supply and Local Plan duties will be re-set following expert advice on accelerating delivery. If the Community Infrastructure Levy is to be replaced by a simplified flat national charge, the effect on infrastructure funding and the transitional arrangements need to be understood now, so that schemes in the pipeline do not get put into suspended animation.

The statement gives some clues about the Government’s direction of travel but, funding commitments aside, offers little substance.  We still await the detail in the Housing White Paper which we are told will be published “soon”.  Reasons for the delay are unclear. Have responses to leaks on more radical measures, such as penalising developers for slow delivery, prompted a re-think?

Mind the gap – if Starter Homes survive, there will be blood

cake

The Starter Homes initiative now faces an uphill struggle onto the statute books following setbacks in the House of Lords. Critics should be careful not to write them off, though, because the Government is adopting a twin track approach that is likely to deliver changes this year either way which will disrupt and reshape planning debates.

Even if the radical Starter Homes Duty is unravelled successfully by the House of Lords, it seems very likely that the Government will modify the NPPF  to make Starter Homes a qualifying affordable housing tenure and, potentially, attempt to give it the primacy that the Housing and Planning Bill 2015/16 was aimed at until the Lords rebelled.

Either way, the changes will undoubtedly have a radical effect on Local Plan and application processes:

  • Local Plan snakes and ladders. Again.  More complication, more fuss and evidence base changes. Government is likely to change guidance on Housing Needs assessment, to identify first time buyers as in housing need. This will overturn the apple cart on existing SHMAs and Local Plans, which will immediately become out of date.
  • Starter Homes will be exempt from CIL. There is no detail in the Technical Consultation on how or when this will come into effect or how the clawback will work where homes are sold in breach of the protected period restrictions. Care is needed in swapping tenures ahead of the changes coming into effect.
  • Transitional measures. The current Starter Homes Technical Consultation is not clear how any Starter Homes requirement would be phased in.  The industry must have some headroom so that the changes do not delay schemes submitted before a sensible transitional date.
  • There will be winners – the new price caps should deliver better returns where there is a straight swap for Shared Ownership.  Authorities will seek an increase in overall affordable provision.  The changes may end up bolstering the case for a fixed percentage of affordable housing in London.  At Lower Graylingwell, the 30% affordable provision has increased to 50% Starter Homes, for example. Developers will need to plan for the demise of ‘golden brick’ payments by Registered Providers, though, and assess the cashflow implications of another 20% of product as sale tenure. Marginal sites, including previously developed green belt will be sold heavily on the back of Starter Home delivery and should expect kinder words on appeal as a result.
  • The allowance for commuted sums in ‘high value areas’ will perpetuate the existing difficulty of policies that surrender to landowner expectations and muddy the waters for developers bidding for land.
  • There will be blood. The changes will bypass conventional housing need. Reluctant and resistant authorities with backlogs of vulnerable and excluded people on the housing register who cannot access a £450k home will point to the fundamental jurisdiction in the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 to take local, democratic decisions in the interest of good planning.

They may weigh the breach of the Starter Homes duty against the duty to meet needs. The extent to which the Regulations can oust that, or any breach creates a ground for legal challenge, will come to the fore. Great care will also be needed on reporting the effects of the affordability sacrifice.

Non-starter? New homes proposals are going to shake things up, if they survive

The Government’s Starter Homes proposals have been around for a while – consultation in 2014 led to new policies in March 2015, backing the commitment to deliver 200,000 by 2020, freeing Starter Homes ‘exceptions sites’ from affordable housing requirements and encouraging authorities to search for sites. The Housing and Planning Bill 2015-16 measures intended to realise that commitment will go well beyond the existing policy, if they survive the House of Lords Report stage.

Big picture

cakeStarter Homes will be new homes [1] for purchase only (and only by first time buyers under 40) to be sold at the lesser of 80% of market value or £450,000 in London (and £250,000 elsewhere).

  • Authorities will be under a statutory ‘general duty’ to promote Starter Homes when considering planning applications
  • A power for the Government to specify the proportion of Starter Homes on specific types of sites, nationally
  • A power for the Secretary of State to issue ‘compliance directions’ requiring Local Plan policies to be disregarded. This is a hitherto unknown command power by central Government and is possible casualty of the House of Lords’ scrutiny.

The Government has already made clear that tenure changes should be accepted without changes to the overall amounts of provision in S106 renegotiations.  The HCA is already putting this into practice, tenure swapping a policy compliant affordable split to Starter Homes on its Lower Graylingwell scheme in West Sussex.

All is (nearly) revealed

The NPPF Review has not been clear about the extent to which Starter Homes will actually be treated as affordable housing (albeit that they will be exempt from providing it).  We understand that the significance of the Starter Homes Technical Consultation on the Regulations which will shape the regime is that:

  • There will be a fixed 20% requirement for most schemes of 10 units or above.  Viability testing will be permitted, but the threshold for exceptions is likely to be a higher bar than hitherto accepted in viability appeals.
  • Starter Homes will be affordable housing in policy terms. In re-opening the NPPF consultation on changes to the definition of affordable housing, the Government is signalling its intention to modify the NPPF to allow Starter Homes to qualify. We understand that they are meant to be a ‘top slice’ of viability, which is intended to ensure that Starter Homes always float to the top of the affordable tenure pile in appraisals.
  • The 8 year ‘restricted period’ during which first time buyers will have restricted selling rights will allow the percentage of market value to taper up (like staircasing Shared Ownership equity).  This responds to concerns by lenders about the effect of sudden pulses of de-restricted units hitting the market at the same time.  These periods are controversial and likely to be significantly amended following the cross-party rebellion in the House of Lords.
  • Units will not be able to be let. The attractiveness of this, alongside a period where the market for re-sales is narrowed to first time buyers under 40 remains to be seen.
  • PRS is likely to benefit from a blanket exemption but will be expected to yield a commuted sum. The Government is likely to require such sums to be calculated based on the gain in value to the developer (and to require authorities to deliver Starter Homes with it). How it will factor in the costs of assembling land to do so is moot.
  • Standard S106 wording is being prepared.

Rebel Alliance

The defeats suffered by the Government at the Third Reading stage in the House of Lords on 11 April 2016 now cast a shadow over how radical this new tenure is likely to be. Amendments backed by a cross-party alliance of peers would:

  • Extend the protected period to 20 years and force starter homes owners to repay any discount (tapering by 1/20 each year) where selling earlier
  • Return control to local authorities on how many starter homes should be delivered locally, and was backed by a majority of 86 peers.

Both amendments were back by majorities of at least 85 peers and the likelihood of the radical changes envisaged by the flagship policy announcements last year coming into effect in 2016 look limited.

[1] including those constructed but not yet occupied