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The new New Towns Revolution

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In May we wrote about Lord Matthew Taylor’s clause in what became the Neighbourhood Planning Act 2017 introducing provision for locally led new towns. The clause provided a skeleton framework.

Flesh is now being put on the bones. Draft regulations have been published by DCLG setting out the way in which local authorities will step into the place of the Secretary of State and oversee locally led new towns. With the exception of the power to confirm CPOs, local authorities will be responsible for guiding and monitoring the new New Towns.

Building on the experience of the old New Towns, local authorities will be required, from the outset, to plan for the long term stewardship of the assets of the new town for the benefit of the community. As described in the consultation paper this should ensure that the powers are used to create places “that are sustainable for the long term, with the resources to reinvest both in the renewal of the physical place and support a thriving and diverse community“.

The only false note in the draft regulations is a requirement for Treasury consent if the outstanding borrowing of a development corporation is in excess of £100 million. Almost any genuine new town will, at least potentially, need more debt than £100 million. The “risk” that the Treasury may refuse consent or impose conditions on it makes it far less likely that the development corporation model will be used. Having committed capital to acquire the land and provide infrastructure, no sensible local authority would want to take the risk of not being able to complete the development and secure a return on that investment.

Since the Chancellor explicitly endorsed the idea of five new towns, without financial recourse to the Treasury, it is assumed that this “hangover” from the old New Towns will be lifted.